Sep 28, 2022  
2018-2019 Academic Catalog (August 2018 - July 2019) 
    
2018-2019 Academic Catalog (August 2018 - July 2019) [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Accounting

  
  •  

    ACCT 205 Principles of Accounting I

    (3)
    The study of fundamental accounting theory and procedures, including the organization of accounts, the accounting cycle, time value of money concepts, and the preparation of financial statements for sole proprietorships and corporations.


(3)
  
  •  

    ACCT 206 Principles of Accounting II

    (3)
    Prerequisites:   recommended
    Further fundamental study of the accounting process as applied to preparation of the financial statements (cash flows), manufacturing accounting, and managerial accounting issues.


(3)
  
  •  

    ACCT 303 Accounting Regulations

    (3)
    Prerequisites: BGEN 301  
    An in-depth review of legal concepts with specific emphasis on those areas of Business Law encountered by CPAs.


    Note: This Course restricted to students who have been accepted into the Department of Business or are in Concord academic programs that have made prior arrangements to include these courses in their curriculum requirements.
(3)
  
  •  

    ACCT 305 Intermediate Accounting I

    (3)
    Prerequisites:    (grade of C or better)
    A detailed study of the theoretical and practical aspects of financial accounting, including financial statements and valuation of assets.


    Note: This course is restricted to students who have been accepted as business students or are in Concord academic programs that have made prior arrangements to include these courses in their curriculum requirements.
(3)
  
  •  

    ACCT 306 Intermediate Accounting II

    (3)
    Prerequisites: ACCT 305  (grade of C or better)
    The continuation of the study of financial accounting. Topics include: liabilities, stockholder’s equity, pensions, leases, and income tax.


    Note: This course is restricted to students who have been accepted as business students or are in Concord academic programs that have made prior arrangements to include these courses in their curriculum requirements.
(3)
  
  •  

    ACCT 307 Intermediate Accounting III

    (3)
    Prerequisites: ACCT 306  (grade of C or better)
    This elective course develops familiarity with modern accounting research into various accounting databases and written reports of findings and conclusions.  These are skills essential in the accounting profession and specifically tested on the CPA exam.


    Note: This course is restricted to students who have been accepted as business students or are in Concord academic programs that have made prior arrangements to include these courses in their curriculum requirements.
(3)
  
  •  

    ACCT 310 Federal and State Taxation I

    (3)
    This course introduces the basic concepts of individual federal taxation.  It focuses on principles and techniques of federal taxable and nontaxable events, the computation of tax liability, basis, credits available, exclusions and deductions.  Students are required to complete tax returns.


(3)
  
  •  

    ACCT 311 Federal and State Taxation II

    (3)
    Prerequisites:   
    An analysis of the principles and of federal tax for corporations, partnerships, and LLC’s.  Also an introduction to gift and estate taxation and sales and use taxes.


(3)
  
  •  

    ACCT 315 Governmental and Not for Profit Accounting

    (3)


    Prerequisites:   (grade of C or better)

     
    A study of the preparation and use of accounting information in the financial management of governmental and nonprofit entities.


    Note: This course is restricted to students who have been accepted as business students or are in Concord academic programs that have made prior arrangements to include these courses in their curriculum requirements.

(3)
  
  •  

    ACCT 318 Cost Accounting

    (3)
    Prerequisites:   (grade of C or better)
    A study of the traditional costing systems for manufacturing enterprises, including job order, process, and standard costing as well as modern approaches in a just-in-time, world-class environment.  Application of budgets and various analyses for manufacturing and service enterprises.


(3)
  
  •  

    ACCT 320 Special Topics: Accounting

    (1-3)
    .


(1-3)
  
  •  

    ACCT 401 Auditing

    (3)
    Prerequisites: ACCT 305  and ACCT 306 .
    An introduction to auditing principles, standards, and procedures used in independent and internal auditing.


    Note: This course is restricted to students who have been accepted as business students or are in Concord academic programs that have made prior arrangements to include these courses in their curriculum requirements.
(3)
  
  •  

    ACCT 405 Advanced Accounting

    (3)
    Prerequisites: ACCT 306 .
    The in-depth study of partnership operations, partnership and corporate liquidations, reorganization and debt restructuring, business combinations and consolidated financial statements.


    Note: This course is restricted to students who have been accepted as business students or are in Concord academic programs that have made prior arrangements to include these courses in their curriculum requirements.
(3)
  
  •  

    ACCT 415 Accounting Information Systems

    (3)


    Prerequisites:  

      (grade of C or better) and BGEN 222  
    Introduction to accounting systems. Emphasis on design, application, and implementation of accounting systems with attention to internal control and the audit trail. Usage of various software packages to complete, manage, and operate a simulated professional accounting environment.


    Note: This course is restricted to students who have been accepted as business students or are in Concord academic programs that have made prior arrangements to include these courses in their curriculum requirements.

(3)
  
  •  

    ACCT 417 VITA Experience

    (3)
    Co-requisites: ACCT 417L  

    The Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) program offers supervised work-training in the IRS VITA and Tax Counseling (TCE) programs.  The course offers a significant educational experience by providing hands-on exposure in the field of income tax and tax return preparation.  Students must earn the IRS Certification to participate in the VITA program and must contribute services in all scheduled VITA sessions.  The course goals are completed by April 15.


(3)
  
  •  

    ACCT 417L VITA Experience Lab

    (0)
    Co-requisites: ACCT 417  

    This lab is required to fulfill the requirements of the VITA Experience class.


(0)
  
  •  

    ACCT 420 Special Topics: Accounting

    (3)
    Prerequisites: Based upon course content, the instructor will determine required prerequisite(s).
    Selected topics in the contemporary accounting environment will be explored.


    Note: This course is restricted to students who have been accepted as business students or are in Concord academic programs that have made prior arrangements to include these courses in their curriculum requirements.
(3)
  
  •  

    ACCT 440 Independent Study: Accounting

    (3)


    Prerequisites: Academic GPA of 3.0, upper level standing in business, and Department approval of study documentation.
    Independent study in the field of Accounting to study a subject not normally treated in-depth in other courses. The subject selection requires mutual agreement of student and instructor.  Application must have a clear, substantiated and detailed description of the independent study.  The student must secure necessary approval prior to registration.

    Note:  This course restricted to students who have been accepted into the Department of Business or are in Concord academic programs that have made prior arrangements to include these courses in their curriculum documentation.


(3)
  
  •  

    ACCT 450 Internship: Accounting

    (1-6)


    Prerequisites: BGEN 222  , BGEN 205  , ACCT 306  , junior class standing; 2.50 GPA earned at Concord.  Available to students whether or not they have had prior work experience, but no credit for prior work. Offered only as pass/fail and contingent upon availability of appropriate placement.
    A supervised accounting internship, full or part-time, in any of the following:  accounting firms. companies, governments, or not-for-profit organizations.  (1-6 credit hours, total hours earned to be pre-approved by the coordinator upon receipt of Accounting-Related Learning Objectives submitted by the employer).  This course provides the students with the opportunity to apply theoretical knowledge to practical situations in an organizational setting.  Internships must be completed during the semester in which the student has registered, without exception.

    Note:  This course is restricted to students who have been accepted as business students or are in Concord academic programs that have made prior arrangements to include these courses in their curriculum requirements.


(1-6)
  
  •  

    ACCT 470 Research: Accounting

    (1-3)
    .


(1-3)

Appalachian Studies

  
  •  

    APST 101 Introduction to Appalachian Studies

    (3)
    Explores the historical and contemporary regional identity of Appalachia and its place in American society.


(3)
  
  •  

    APST 102 Appalachian Literature

    (1)
       


    Also listed as: ENGL 2205 .
(1)
  
  •  

    APST 220 Special Topics

    (1-3)
    Provides concentrated study on a specific topic relating to the Appalachians. It may be repeated for credit, and the title of the special topic will be indicated on the student’s transcript. Example of special studies include Introduction to Appalachian Folk Arts and Crafts, The Black Experience in Appalachia, Appalachian Culture, Economic Problems of the Appalachians, Local Flora (also listed as BIOL 265 ), Human Diversity (also listed as SOWK 302 ), and West Virginia History, Geography, and Government (also listed as HIST 307  and POSC 307 ).


    Also listed as: BIOL 265 , SOWK 302 , HIST 307  and POSC 307 .
(1-3)
  
  •  

    APST 255 Regional Studies

    (3)
    Regional studies focus on selected portions of the Earth’s surface and the interdependency of nations.  Regional geography courses prepare students to be aware of and understand people culturally different from themselves.  Courses include the following:  Europe, North Africa, the Middle East, Russia, Asia, the Appalachians, Latin America, the U.S.-Mexico Borderlands, and North America.  Regional courses may be taken repeatedly for credit, so long as there is no duplication of the area studied.  Region of study will be reported on the student’s transcript.


(3)
   (3)
  
  •  

    APST 440 Independent Study

    (3)
    Prerequisites: Minimum of 15 hours of course work completed in the discipline and consent of instructor and department chairperson.
    Application must be made and approved by a committee before the student can register for the independent study.  Applications may be picked up from the department chariperson.


    Note: Repeatable for credit.
(3)
  
  •  

    APST 455 Special Studies in Appalachia

    (1)
    Provides concentrated study on a specific Appalachian Studies topic. May be repeated for credit and the title of the special study will be included on the student’s transcript. Courses include: Rock Climbing, Appalachian Archeology, Planning, Ultimate Frisbee, Latin for Beginners, Handgun Safety, and Appalachian Horsemanship.


(1)
  
  •  

    APST 480 Honors Courses

    (3)
    Juniors and seniors who qualify for Honors Courses are offered the opportunity to study apart from conventional classroom work. Interested students should contact the Department Chairperson for further information.


(3)
  
  •  

    APST 481 Honors Courses

    (3)
    Juniors and seniors who qualify for Honors Courses are offered the opportunity to study apart from conventional classroom work. Interested students should contact the Department Chairperson for further information.


(3)
  
  •  

    APST 1020 Introduction to the Folk Music of Appalachia

    (1)
    An examination of the importance, form, structure, and instruments of Appalachian Folk Music. Both recorded music and live performances are used to illustrate the elements of the music.


(1)
  
  •  

    APST 1023 Appalachian Traditional Dances

    (1)
    An introduction to country dances and group dances other than square.


    Note: (F, S)
(1)
  
  •  

    APST 2010 Introduction to the Collection of Oral History

    (1)
    An introduction to the objectives and techniques of collecting oral history. Students will be required to participate in collection activities.


(1)
  
  •  

    APST 3302 Appalachian Trails

    (1)
    Includes a review of the history, purpose and location of the Appalachian Trail, as well as trail hiking in general. Preparation, equipment and supplies for hiking and backpacking will be discussed. Participation in an overnight hike on the Appalachian Trail is required.


(1)
  
  •  

    APST 3503 Appalachian Writers

    (1)
    See Languages and Literature mini-courses.


(1)

Art

  
  •  

    ART 101 Introduction to Visual Arts

    (3)
    Basic studio experiences.


(3)
  
  •  

    ART 103 Drawing I

    (3)
    Introduction to basic drawing techniques and media. Entering art majors are to enroll their first semester.  A grade of C or better is required for credit for art majors.


(3)
  
  •  

    ART 104 Drawing II

    (3)
    Further exploration of drawing techniques and media.  A grade of C or better is required for credit for art majors.


(3)
  
  •  

    ART 105 Design I

    (3)
    Design on the two dimensional surface: elements of form related to increasingly complex concepts of space, color, and design. Entering art majors are to enroll their first semester.  A grade of C or better is required for credit for art majors.


(3)
  
  •  

    ART 106 Basic Computer Graphics

    (3)
    An introductory computer graphics design course to develop skills in the use of basic computer graphics programs, digital cameras, scanners and printers for the preparation of commercial artwork.  A grade of C or better is required for credit for art majors.


(3)
  
  •  

    ART 200 Art for the Classroom Teacher

    (1)
    This course is intended to familiarize students with media and techniques pertaining to Art within the public school system. This course is an introduction to Art Education theory.


(1)
  
  •  

    ART 202 Design II

    (3)
    Prerequisites: ART 105 . Grade of C or better in ART 105 .
    Further exploration of the elements of design with emphasis on three-dimensional work.  A grade of C or better is required for credit for art majors.


(3)
  
  •  

    ART 204 Painting I

    (3)
    Prerequisites: Grade of C or better in ART 103 , ART 104 , ART 105  and/or consent of instructor. 
    Introduction to basic painting media with primary concentration in oil and acrylics.  A grade of C or better is required for credit for art majors.


(3)
  
  •  

    ART 205 Ceramics I

    (3)
    An introduction to the basic forming methods (hand-building and potter’s wheels), through the design and execution of various functional and sculptural projects; glazing and kiln firing techniques; historical and contemporary trends. A grade of C or better is required for credit for art majors.


(3)
  
  •  

    ART 206 Ceramic Sculpture

    (3)
    Sculpture construction in clay, including freestanding and mural sculptures; sculptural clay bodies, glazes, kiln firings and aesthetic considerations. A grade of C or better is required for credit for art majors.


(3)
  
  •  

    ART 216 Photography I

    (3)
    A 35mm photography class open to general admissions. An introduction to photographic equipment, techniques and designs; explorations in both digital and film photography. A grade of a C or better is required for credit for art majors.


    Note: Students are expected to have their own 35mm SLR camera and supplies.
(3)
  
  •  

    ART 220 Special Topics

    (1-3)
    .


(1-3)
  
  •  

    ART 221 Art History I

    (3)
    The development of art from its early origins to the Fifteenth Century.  A grade of C or better is required for credit for art majors.


(3)
  
  •  

    ART 222 Basic Production Techniques

    (3)
    Prerequisites: Grade of C or better in ART 103 , ART 105 , and ART 106 , and/or consent of instructor.
    Introduction to production techniques for commercial art along with an introduction to the advertising business. A grade of a C or better is required for credit for art majors.


(3)
  
  •  

    ART 223 Typography

    (3)
    Prerequisites: Grade of C or better in ART 103 , ART 105 , and ART 106 . 
    The student will become proficient in typography techniques, including lettering layout and computer graphics. A grade of a C or better is required for credit for art majors.


(3)
  
  •  

    ART 224 Art Education Studio I

    (3)
    An intense studio experience using various art media, materials and processes. Intended for prospective art specialists teaching Pre K-Adult. A grade of C or better is required for credit for art majors.


(3)
  
  •  

    ART 229 Basic Illustration Techniques

    (3)
    Prerequisites: Grade of C or better in ART 103 , ART 104 , ART 105 , and ART 106 , previous or concurrent enrollment in ART 221  or ART 331 , and/or consent of instructor.
    An advertising/graphic design course emphasizing rendering techniques in various media. A grade of a C or better is required for credit for art majors.


(3)
  
  •  

    ART 232 Weaving I

    (3)
    Introduction to methods, materials, and tools for hand weaving. Not offered on a regular basis.  A grade of C or better is required for credit for art majors.


(3)
  
  •  

    ART 302 Weaving II

    (3)
    Prerequisites: ART 232 .
    Further explorations of methods, materials, and tools. Not offered on a regular basis.  A grade of C or better is required for credit for art majors.


(3)
  
  •  

    ART 303 Jewelry I

    (3)
    Introduction to jewelry design and techniques. Not offered on a regular basis.  A grade of C or better is required for credit for art majors.


(3)
  
  •  

    ART 304 Water-Color Painting

    (3)
    A basic course in water-color painting. The student will be introduced to different watercolor techniques and tools.  A grade of C or better is required for credit for art majors.


(3)
  
  •  

    ART 305 Painting II

    (3)
    Prerequisites: ART 204  or ART 304 , or consent of instructor.
    Further exploration of painting techniques and media.  A grade of C or better is required for credit for art majors.


(3)
  
  •  

    ART 307 Sculpture I

    (3)
    An introduction to sculptural design and construction techniques, using a variety of media; discussions of contemporary and historical examples.  A grade of C or better is required for credit for art majors.


(3)
  
  •  

    ART 308 Printmaking I

    (3)
    An introduction to printmaking.  A grade of C or better is required for credit for art majors.


(3)
  
  •  

    ART 318 Art Education for Early Childhood and Middle Childhood Education

    (3)
    Study of contemporary trends in early childhood and elementary art education. Not offered on a regular basis. A grade of C or better is required for credit for art majors.


(3)
  
  •  

    ART 320 Special Topics

    (1-3)
    .


(1-3)
  
  •  

    ART 321 Art Education for Adolescent Education.

    (3)
    Prerequisites: Grade of C or better in ART 318 . ART 103 , ART 104 , ART 224 . 
    Study of philosophies and theories of art education; curriculum-planning, supervising and teaching of art in the modern secondary school. Not offered on a regular basis.  A grade of C or better is required for credit for art majors.


(3)
  
  •  

    ART 323 Jewelry II

    (3)
    Prerequisites: ART 303 .
    Creative design and good craftsmanship stressed. Work in varied media. Not offered on a regular basis.  A grade of C or better is required for credit for art majors.


(3)
  
  •  

    ART 324 Art Education Studio II

    (3)
    Prerequisites: Grade of C or better in ART 224 .
    Further experience using various art materials and processes. Intended for prospective art specialists teaching Pre K-Adult.  A grade of C or better is required for credit for art majors.


(3)
  
  •  

    ART 329 Advanced Illustration

    (3)
    Prerequisites: C or better in ART 105 , ART 106 , and ART 222 ; previous or concurrent enrollment in   or ART 331 .
    Illustration methods and problems in various media, including computer graphics, as applied to specific aspects of visual communication. A grade of a C or better is required for credit for art majors.


(3)
  
  •  

    ART 330 Graphic Techniques

    (3)
    Prerequisites: C or better in ART 103 , ART 104 ART 105 , ART 106 , ART 222 , ART 223 , and ART 229  or consent of instructor.
    A studio course to develop computer skills and methods in the preparation and execution of art work for commercial reproduction. A grade of a C or better is required for credit for art majors.


(3)
  
  •  

    ART 331 Art History II

    (3)
    A study of art from the Sixteenth Century to the present.  A grade of C or better is required for credit for art majors.


(3)
  
  •  

    ART 334 Advertising Design and Copywriting

    (3)
    Prerequisites: ENGL 101  and ART 222  or consent of instructor.
    Planning the advertising message through the use of written words in association with the principles of design. A grade of a C or better is required for credit for art majors.


(3)
  
  •  

    ART 360 Studies in Computer Graphics

    (3)
    Prerequisites: Grade of C or better in ART 106 , ART 222 , and ART 223  or consent of instructor.
    Development of computer techniques in art for students with intermediate computer graphic skills. Students will work on independent projects including professional portfolio developments. There will be lecture and lab experiences. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of credit. A grade of a C or better is required for credit for art majors.


(3)
  
  •  

    ART 361 Web Design

    (3)
    Prerequisites: Grade of C or better in ART 106 , and ART 223  or consent of instructor.
    The use of computer techniques in art to aid the development of introductory web based design concepts. There will be lecture and lab experiences.  A grade of C or better is required for credit for art majors.


(3)
  
  •  

    ART 402 Advanced Advertising Design

    (3)
    Prerequisites: Grade of C or better in ART 329 , and ART 330 , or consent of instructor.
    Problems in advertising production and design. Various media are explored. The stress is on creative judgment and technical facility, including proficiency in advanced computer graphics. A grade of a C or better is required for credit for art majors.


(3)
  
  •  

    ART 403 Ceramics II

    (3)
    Prerequisites: ART 205  or ART 206 .
    An intermediate course in ceramics, emphasizing more individualized study of design and techniques; research and discussion of technical and historical subjects.  A grade of C or better is required for credit for art majors.


(3)
  
  •  

    ART 405 Sculpture II

    (3)
    Prerequisites: ART 307 .
    Further explorations of sculptural media and design, focusing on individual sculptural styles and attitudes.  A grade of C or better is required for credit for art majors.


    Note: Any 424 class may be taken for up to 18 hours credit, however no 424 class may be taken for more than 6 hours credit in any given semester.
(3)
  
  •  

    ART 406 Printmaking II

    (3)
    Prerequisites: ART 308 .
    The student will be expected to develop a proficiency in one or more of the relief, intaglio, or planographic processes.  A grade of C or better is required for credit for art majors.


(3)
  
  •  

    ART 410 Current Issues in Art

    (3)
    Prerequisites: ART 101 or ART 221  or ART 331  or permission of instructor.
    Designed to coincide with major museum exhibitions during a given semester. The readings, lectures and discussions will culminate in a field trip to the exhibition(s) being studied. Not offered on a regular basis.  A grade of C or better is required for credit for art majors.


(3)
  
  •  

    ART 415 Senior Seminar

    (1)
    Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.
    Course designed to help prepare seniors for upcoming senior jury and how to professionally display a senior show.  A grade of C or better is required for credit for art majors.


(1)
  
  •  

    ART 420 Special Topics

    (1-3)
    .


(1-3)
  
  •  

    ART 424 Advanced Studies in Visual Arts

    (1-6)
    Prerequisites: Grade of C or better in ART 221  or ART 331  and the permission permission of the instructor, and overall GPA of at least 2.50, a grade point average of at least 3.00 in Studio Art courses and the completion of 30 or more semester hours.
    Under one general heading, a variety of courses are available to meet requirements in the visual arts. Advanced Studies in Visual Arts is a continuation of principles introduced in lower division courses with increasing emphasis on independent projects. Each of these courses requires a high degree of commitment and self-discipline on the part of the student due to the rigorous curriculum and the individualized course structure. The student will focus attention on one of the specific areas listed below. Topics of study will be indicated on the student’s transcript. The Emphasis of study may be divided into the following topics or areas of concentration: Art History, Sculpture, Installation, Painting, Advertising/ Graphic Design, Art Education, Illustration, Jewelry, Ceramics, Drawing, Weaving, Print-making, Crafts, Portfolio Preparation or Photography. Upon registering for any Advanced Studies course, the student must submit a written proposal outlining the project and anticipated research methods to an appropriate art faculty member. The aforementioned faculty member will be responsible for the evaluation of the project and a grade assignment at the conclusion of the semester.  A grade of C or better is required for credit for art majors.


(1-6)
  
  •  

    ART 424C Advanced Studies in Ceramics

    (1-6)
    Prerequisites: Grade of C or better in ART 221  or ART 331  and the permission permission of the instructor, and overall GPA of at least 2.50, a grade point average of at least 3.00 in Studio Art courses and the completion of 30 or more semester hours.
    Under one general heading, a variety of courses are available to meet requirements in the visual arts. Advanced Studies in Visual Arts is a continuation of principles introduced in lower division courses with increasing emphasis on independent projects. Each of these courses requires a high degree of commitment and self-discipline on the part of the student due to the rigorous curriculum and the individualized course structure. The student will focus attention on one of the specific areas listed below. Topics of study will be indicated on the student’s transcript. The Emphasis of study may be divided into the following topics or areas of concentration: Art History, Sculpture, Installation, Painting, Advertising/ Graphic Design, Art Education, Illustration, Jewelry, Ceramics, Drawing, Weaving, Print-making, Crafts, Portfolio Preparation or Photography. Upon registering for any Advanced Studies course, the student must submit a written proposal outlining the project and anticipated research methods to an appropriate art faculty member. The aforementioned faculty member will be responsible for the evaluation of the project and a grade assignment at the conclusion of the semester.  A grade of C or better is required for credit for art majors.


(1-6)
  
  •  

    ART 424S Advanced Studies in Sculpture

    (1-6)
    Prerequisites: Grade of C or better in ART 221  or ART 331  and the permission permission of the instructor, and overall GPA of at least 2.50, a grade point average of at least 3.00 in Studio Art courses and the completion of 30 or more semester hours.
    Under one general heading, a variety of courses are available to meet requirements in the visual arts. Advanced Studies in Visual Arts is a continuation of principles introduced in lower department courses with increasing emphasis on independent projects. Each of these courses requires a high degree of commitment and self-discipline on the part of the student due to the rigorous curriculum and the individualized course structure. The student will focus attention on one of the specific areas listed below. Topics of study will be indicated on the student’s transcript. The Emphasis of study may be divided into the following topics or areas of concentration: Art History, Sculpture, Installation, Painting, Advertising/ Graphic Design, Art Education, Illustration, Jewelry, Ceramics, Drawing, Weaving, Print-making, Crafts, Portfolio Preparation or Photography. Upon registering for any Advanced Studies course, the student must submit a written proposal outlining the project and anticipated research methods to an appropriate art faculty member. The aforementioned faculty member will be responsible for the evaluation of the project and a grade assignment at the conclusion of the semester.  A grade of C or better is required for credit for art majors.


(1-6)
  
  •  

    ART 430 Seminar

    (1-3)
    .


(1-3)
  
  •  

    ART 440 Independent Study

    (1-12)
    Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.
    An opportunity for the student to enroll in a course of intensified study (mutually agreed upon by the student and the instructor) not normally covered in other courses. Application must be made and approved by a committee before the student can register for the independent study.  A grade of C or better is required for credit for art majors.


(1-12)
  
  •  

    ART 450 Advertising/Graphic Design Internship

    (1-6)
    Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.
    A practical on-the-job training experience with the student assigned to advertising or related business. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 hours; however, only 3 hours may count toward the degree. Normally taken after the junior year during the first summer term.  A grade of C or better is required for credit for art majors.


(1-6)
  
  •  

    ART 460 Practicum

    (1-3)
    .


(1-3)
  
  •  

    ART 470 Research

    (1-3)
    .


(1-3)

Athletic Training

  
  •  

    AT 126 Introduction to Athletic Training

    (2)
    This introductory course is for students interested in learning more about the athletic training profession.  Students will receive an introduction to professional organizations and issues, in addition to instruction and assessment of basic clinical skills necessary for progress to the next Athletic Training course.


    Two hours lecture.
(2)
  
  •  

    AT 220 Athletic Training Special Topics

    (1-3)
    A specialized study of various topics and problems in the field of athletic training.  Each offering of the course will be planned around a separate and different topic, chosen and designed by the individual instructor.


(1-3)
  
  •  

    AT 230 Athletic Training Seminar

    (1-3)
    On various topics in athletic training.


(1-3)
  
  •  

    AT 236 Evaluation of Lower Extremity Injuries

    (4)
    Prerequisites: BIOL 335   and BIOL 335L
    Co-requisites: AT 236L  

    This course entails the study of evaluation techniques of injuries to the lower extremities and lower back. Review of anatomy, injury recognition, muscle testing, treatment protocols and preventative measures are also examined.


    Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory.
(4)
  
  •  

    AT 236L Evaluation of Lower Extremity Injuries Lab

    (0)
    Prerequisites: BIOL 335  and BIOL 335L
    Co-requisites: AT 236  

    This course provides the learner with a practical application of concepts and techniques regarding the evaluation of injuries to the lower extremities and lower back. Specifically, laboratory sessions are designed to introduce the learner to observation, palpation, manual muscle testing, range of motion, and special testing procedures utilized when evaluating injuries of the lower extremities and lower back.


    Two hours laboratory (in conjunction with AT 236 lecture).
(0)
  
  •  

    AT 237 Evaluation of Upper Extremity Injuries

    (4)
    Prerequisites: BIOL 335  and BIOL 335L
    Co-requisites: AT 237L  

    This course entails the study of evaluation techniques of injuries to the upper extremities. Review of anatomy, injury recognition, muscle testing, treatment protocols and preventative measures are also examined.


    Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory.
(4)
  
  •  

    AT 237L Evaluation of Upper Extremity Injuries Lab

    (0)
    Prerequisites: BIOL 335  and BIOL 335L
    Co-requisites: AT 237  

    This course provides the learner with a practical application of concepts and techniques regarding the evaluation of injuries to the upper extremities and thoracic and cervical spines. Specifically, laboratory sessions are designed to introduce the learner to observation, palpation, manual muscle testing, range of motion, and special testing procedures utilized when evaluating injuries of the upper extremities.


    Two hours laboratory (in conjunction with AT 237 lecture).
(0)
  
  •  

    AT 238 Evaluation of Head, Neck and Spine Injuries

    (3)
    Prerequisites: BIOL 335  and BIOL 335L
    Co-requisites: AT 238L  

    This course entails the study of evaluation techniques of injuries to the head, neck, trunk, and spine.  Review of anatomy, injury recognition, muscle testing, treatment protocols and preventative measures are also examined.


(3)
  
  •  

    AT 238L Evaluation of Head, Neck, and Spine Injuries Lab

    (0)
    Prerequisites: BIOL 335  and BIOL 335L
    Co-requisites: AT 238  

    This course entails the study of evaluation techniques of injuries to the head, neck, trunk, and spine.  Specifically, laboratory sessions are designed to introduce the learner to observation, palpation, manual muscle testing, range of motion, and special testing procedures utilized when evaluating injuries of the head, neck, trunk, and spine.


(0)
  
  •  

    AT 240 Independent Study

    (1-3)
    Consists of advanced study, reading, and/or research in athletic training.


(1-3)
  
  •  

    AT 242 Prevention and Care of Common Injuries and Illnesses

    (2)
    Co-requisites: AT 243  

    This course will describe the mechanism, prevention, management and disposition of common athletic and exercise injuries and conditions. Practical experiences include the application of prophylactic and supportive techniques to the major joints of the body.


    Two hours lecture, one hour laboratory.
(2)
  
  •  

    AT 243 Acute Care of Athletic Injuries Lab

    (1)
    Co-requisites:   

    This course is a laboratory section to complement AT 242 . Emphasis will be placed on the practical application of the content and concepts presented in this course, which is an overview of the mechanism, prevention, management and rehabilitation of injuries to the physically active patient.


    One hour laboratory.
(1)
  
  •  

    AT 250 Athletic Training Internships

    (1-6)
    Provides students with opportunities to develop skills, knowledge, theories, and techniques with procedures from the class work applied to field situations.  Must be approved by faculty supervisor.


(1-6)
  
  •  

    AT 314 Exercise Physiology

    (3)
    Prerequisites: BIOL 336  and BIOL 336L
    Co-requisites: AT 314L  

    Exercise Physiology is an evaluation of the acute responses and chronic adaptations of the body to the stresses and exercise.  This class will cover physiological responses/adaptations to exercise and the effects of physical activity on the human body and organic systems.


(3)
  
  •  

    AT 314L Exercise Testing and Prescription

    (1)
    Prerequisites: BIOL 336  and BIOL 336L
    Co-requisites: AT 314  

    This Exercise Physiology Lab will explore the applications of topics discussed in the AT 314 lecture.  This class will include strength and condition program development.  This class will include descriptions and application of general tools used to evaluate human physiology and health as it relates to exercise, general wellness, and the environment.


(1)
  
  •  

    AT 320 Athletic Training Special Topics

    (1-3)
    A specialized study of various topics and problems in the field of athletic training.  Each offering of the course will be planned around a separate and different topic, chosen and designed by the individual instructor.


(1-3)
 

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